Save This Buddha!

Golden Buddah, Bangkok, ThailandI am watching with anxiety the events unfolding in Bangkok, where anti-government protesters are conducting sit-ins, and constructing barricades around areas of interest to foreign tourists, as a means to get the government’s attention. Initially, this all seemed like a great example of Ghandi-style peaceful civil disobedience (like when the protesters ground the Bangkok airport to a halt in 2008), but then the bullets started flying, with an accompanying Twitter feed).

My visit to Bangkok was one of my best travel experiences, a positive culture-shock, and one of my favourite places to take photos.

While the safety of the MANY citizens of Bangkok (10M+) is of the paramount importance, it always frustrates me that there doesn’t seem to be any way for the international community to protect artifacts and architecture of such cultural significance. When trouble breaks out, these artifacts become targets, sometimes intentionally, and sometimes by accident.

About 6 months before before 9/11, there were some very clear signs that all was not right in the heads of those ruling Afghanistan. In an effort to erase Afghanistan’s true cultural heritage, the Taliban decided to blow up two giant Buddha statues carved into a cliff near Bamiyan, in defiance of international protests.

Those are bullet holes!

Unfortunately, historic sites are often the most sturdy things to hide behind.

In Chris Hedges’ book “War is a Force that Gives Us Meaning” he indicates that this is a very common element of the prelude to any war; erasing the past to create a new fictitious present. It is particularly prominent in wars that result in ethnic cleansing, like the strife in the Balkan states.

I can’t offer any solutions, only raise awareness. Protecting items of cultural significance isn’t about saving tourism, it is about making sure the truth about the past isn’t eradicated just because it is inconvenient to the present (or it is the sturdiest thing to hide behind when the bullets start to fly).

Yah, I agree…

Life isn't about finding yourself, life is about creating yourself.

My Favourite Concert Photo (by me)

I like this shot for a lot of reasons, but here is a few:

  • I had no business getting a shot this good from the 300 level (go Canon G9!)
  • Taylor Hawkins is one of my favourite drummers
  • Hey, he is a Foo Fighter
  • I really like the way the concert lights shine off that top cymbal
  • The blur in the image really captures his dynamic motion
  • He appears to be having a blast!

Technically speaking, you aren’t supposed to take pictures at concerts unless you have permission, but with the number of camera phones in existence, it is really pretty silly to try and enforce this (although one of the security guards did tell me to turn it off).

Great concert by the way!!

%d bloggers like this: